CFP: Environmental Humanities and New Materialisms: The Ethics of Decolonizing Nature and Culture, Paris June 2017

 

Via Flaminia Paddeu on the Crit Geog Forum 

8th Annual Conference on the New Materialisms June 7th-9th, 2017, Paris

Organized by: New Materialism: Networking European Scholarship on ‘How Matter Comes to Matter’, European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST), Action IS1307
in association with Ladyss – Laboratoire Dynamiques sociales et recomposition des espaces, and UNESCO – United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization.

Environmental Humanities and New Materialisms: The Ethics of Decolonizing Nature and Culture

Keynote speakers:  Rosi Braidotti (Utrecht University), Bruno Latour (SciencesPo), Angela Mitropoulos (University of Western Sydney), Iris Van der Tuin (Utrecht University)

We are immersed in matter, invaded by streams of living and technological subjects. Our bodies are exchanged, extended and interconnected in myriad different ways. The New Materialisms investigate the incessant materialization of the world. Matter is not a stable substance, neither localizable nor identifiable through clearly defined boundaries. Within both human and nonhuman environments, social and biological ontologies, everything exists in a constant state of change and materialization. The New Materialisms offer an alternative literacy with which to address the task proposed by the political consideration of the relations of difference, as well as those of divides. In the specific terms of feminist scholarship, this literacy has emerged as a “quantum literacy”, offering a significant turn for critical and creative discourses. Yet quantum literacy also possesses relevance beyond feminist theory, as a tool for all of those who are interested in conceiving more adequate terms for expressing knowledge production and the ethical terms of life and nature itself (Bühlmann, Colman & Van Der Tuin, 2016). The political agenda of this literacy offers a number of strategies for the conceptualization of entities and events (for example, migration and refuge; border control and actions of militarism; climate change and ecology), and for wider knowledge production across the sciences and humanities. As such, the New Materialist turn and its provocations coalesce as part of a paradigmatic shift currently occurring in the environmental humanities, and media and technology studies – across the humanities and the sciences – some of which are articulated under the concepts explored in post-capitalist, post-humanist, and post- colonial positions.

Environmental Humanities and New Materialisms share an ethic of decolonizing nature and culture, as they depart from anthropocentric and constructivist positions. Our call is to consider ourselves as permeable, part of the ebb and flow of the Anthropocene, part of the “stuff of the world” (Alaimo, 2016). It is a call to investigate how climate change and the sixth great extinction are captured as scientific data, and to inhabit an environmentally ethical sense of matter within a world caught in the throes of change. New Materialist concepts of living matter upset conventional distinctions between matter and life, inorganic and organic, passive object and active subject (DeLanda, 2000). In Barad’s “agential realism” (2007), material agency does not privilege the human, just as for Bennett, “thing power” (2004) emphasizes the shared material basis and the kinship of all things, regardless of their status – human, animal, vegetable, or mineral. It is through this sense of mutual implication that the New Materialisms can contribute to an ecological ethos. Our call is to consider the New Materialisms as an opportunity to enrich pre-existing conjunctions across environmental philosophy, environmental history, ecocriticism, cultural geography, cultural anthropology, and political ecology, including their debates as captured by the environmental humanities. These fruitful alliances could help build environmental posthumanities, as environmental humanists, activists and stewards work to reveal and reshape the flows of material agencies across regions, environments, animal and human bodies.

The conference Environmental Humanities and New Materialisms: The Ethics of Decolonizing Nature and Culture wants to tap into as well as contribute to such debates.

The intention of the conference is to focus on the following broadly formulated topics and questions:

  • Decoloniality and Environmental Ethics
  • The Environmental Ethics of Feminism, Work and Social Movements
  • Transversal Methodologies
  • Environmental Aesthetics

We invite submissions of proposals for academic papers, performances, projects, personal narratives, and artistic installations, addressing these themes. We also welcome pre-constituted panels and workshops around the topics of the conference.
Practical Information

Abstracts for individual papers and performances (300 words) should be sent in the following format: 1. Title; 2. Presenter(s) + short bio; 3. Institutional affiliation; 4. Abstract; 5. Key words; 6. Technical requirements. Proposals for pre-organized panels and workshops should additionally include a summary paragraph along with proposed session title.

All submitted abstracts, panel proposals, and workshop proposals will be peer reviewed by the conference committee. Deadline for abstracts is the 1st of December 2016. Send the submissions or any questions to: admin@newmaterialism.eu.

More information: www.newmaterialism.eu

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About Owain Jones

I work at Bath Spa University as a Professor of Environmental Humanities. I also write songs and help stage a range of live music with others. I am Chair and Programmer for Priston Festival.
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