Mud Larking! Books, Twitter and BBC Radio programmes

via Mud Larking! Books, Twitter and BBC Radio programmes

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Public Lecture: Community-driven approaches for sustainable conservation and economic benefits: contradictory and complementary aspects of Ehirovipuka and Nyae Nyae conservancies in Namibia; Dr Selma Lendelvo, University of Namibia; Supported by the Centre for the Environmental Humanities and the Global Academy of Liberal Arts; Newton Park Campus; 11th June;4.00 – 5.30 pm

via Public Lecture: Community-driven approaches for sustainable conservation and economic benefits: contradictory and complementary aspects of Ehirovipuka and Nyae Nyae conservancies in Namibia; Dr Selma Lendelvo, University of Namibia; Supported by the Centre for the Environmental Humanities and the Global Academy of Liberal Arts; Newton Park Campus; 11th June;4.00 – 5.30 pm

Could someone become the Woodie Guthrie for the modern environmental crisis? (And Donald Trump!)

Woodie Guthrie has already been mentioned on this blog. Watching a recent film about his life on BBC TV makes me just say that he is a great example of a songwriter/musician who was, or who become, overtly political in his work – but also retained the ability to write very catchy, appealing songs. Most obviously ‘This Land is Your Land’. This song was sung in full by Pete Seeger and Bruce Springsteen at the inauguration of  Barak Obama as US president.  Guthrie has the slogan “This Machine Kills Fascists” written on his guitar. Somewhat strangely, he lived in an apartment block in New York which he became to feel was run on a racist basis (excluding possible back tenants), he wrote about this. The landlord was Fred Trump. Donald Trump’s father.

Given Woodie Guthrie was known as the dust bowl balladeer there is a lot of environmental narrative in his songs, but he was writing at a time when the full extent of the extinction, pollution and climate crises were not known. What would his songs be like now?

Woodie Guthrie bio on Wikipedia here